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How to Lock In Your Loss After a Correction Day, and Get Back on Track: Ch. 3

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THE IDEAL RATIO
In the beginning you will need to keep your calories from fat highest (58-65%), with no carbs eaten (0%), and then some calories from protein (42-35%). This is the Ideal Ratio.

So when you start to re-introduce carbs after the first two days, the percentages of calories from fat grams and from protein grams will decrease slightly, because carbs will be taking up a little room in your diet previously filled by some fat and some protein calories. BUT, remember: fat calories will always still need remain higher than protein calories, and protein calories will always still need to remain higher than carb calories.

A tracker will be invaluable when seeing what this ratio is -- knowing your ratio of calories from each of these is ESSENTIAL. Don't drive yourself crazy trying to compute it on your own; find a good one you can trust (like the one at http://www.MyNetDiary.com -- you can use the site or one of their apps).

CALORIES PER GRAM OF COOKED FOOD ONLY
The calories you count have to be from COOKED food, NOT RAW! So do NOT trust labels on the raw meats, fish, and poultry you eat to give you the info you need to compute anything with this approach. Those labels will be for raw food only! And if you're thinking, "Ahh, I'll just weigh my food after cooking, and use the info on the labels instead, because cooking only makes it weigh less!" you'll be dead wrong. Not only does the weight change from raw to cooked (food usually shrinks), but the ratios of fat/carbs/protein all break down and change in relation to each other. So GO GET A TRACKER instead! Don't try to add this all up on your own, and drive yourself crazy; you need the accuracy and reliability of a tracker. And, your brain will thank you for using a tracker too.

CALORIES, NOT GRAMS THEMSELVES
Something else you need to be conscious of: calories are not grams. Sounds silly to hear that, right? But, think of when you view, on your tracker, the number of grams of fat and protein for example. Those are not the same numbers used in the Ideal Ratio.

It's the amount of calories from each of those grams that's used in the ratio. For instance, there are 9 calories per 1 gram of fat, but only 4 calories per 1 gram of protein. Carbohydrates have 4 calories per 1 gram as well. So this is yet another reason why you need a tracker; you can't just glance at a label and quickly assume the number of grams are what you use in the calculation of your ratio. It's the number of calories from each of those grams that are used in calculating the Ideal Ratio.

I'm restricted from posting more than a few characters of text at a time. So rather than skimp on details, I've decided to split this strategy up into several mini-posts. Think of them as "chapters," in a manner of speaking. Each point in the summary (first listed in the "Introduction") will be covered in a separate chapter, numbered according to the sequence listed.

NEXT BLOG ENTRY: Transitioning to no-carb eating during the first two days of this strategy (Ch. 4)

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Updated September 15th, 2012 at 06:20 PM by GonnaLoseIt

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